Illustrated Articles

Dogs + Pet Services

  • Clicker training is used as a means of clearly and immediately reinforcing a behavior in virtually any species of animal.

  • Fibrous tumors, including hamartomas, are a group of benign tumors arising from fibrous and fibrous-like tissues. Nodular dermatofibrosis can be secondary to (or a consequence of) tumors in the kidney or uterus. Fibrous tumors can develop as the result of underlying, repeated trauma (e.g., pressure on the elbows when lying on hard surfaces and self-trauma with skin allergies). Therefore, once a diagnosis has been made, determining and understanding the underlying cause is important.

  • Mammary tumors in dogs are not very common in North America due to routine spay procedures. Hormones play a role in tumor development in dogs. Dogs spayed before their first heat have only a 0.5% chance of developing mammary tumors. Certain breeds appear to be predisposed to developing mammary tumors. Benign tumors are typically not painful and usually are discovered during routine examination by your veterinarian. Surgery is typically the treatment of choice.

  • Bile acids are made in the liver, released into the intestine to help digest fat, and are reabsorbed into the bloodstream. They can be measured in the blood to determine if the liver is working properly. Indications for the test include elevated liver enzymes, seizures, poor growth, and low blood albumin. The test is usually performed after a 12 hour fast and consists of the measurement of serum bile acids before and 2 hours after a meal. The test can be affected by poor intestinal motility – either from disease, sedation/anesthesia, or if the pet has had part of the intestine removed that is responsible for absorption of bile acids. Bile acids will be high if the liver is not functioning properly. It does not rule out liver disease as disease can affect part of the liver without significantly affecting bile acid production. Elevated bile acids may warrant further diagnostics or monitoring depending on your pet’s condition.

  • There are two methods to prevent estrus, or "heat," in a female dog: surgery and medical management using hormonal drugs.

  • Bite wounds are a common injury veterinarians see. If left alone, wounds have the potential to become more complicated, as they are likely infected and delaying treatment only makes it worse. Antibiotics, pain medications, and stitches may all be involved in the post-bite wound care.

  • Bladder stones are rock-like formations of minerals that develop in the urinary bladder. The most common signs that a dog has bladder stones are hematuria and dysuria. Bladder stones can develop within a few weeks or they may take months to form. Most bladder stones are visible on radiographs or an ultrasonic bladder examination. There are three main treatment options for bladder stones: 1) surgical removal; 2) non-surgical removal by urohydropropulsion, or 3) dietary dissolution. Prevention is possible in some cases, depending on the chemical composition of the stones.

  • When the digestive tract is upset, vomiting and diarrhea may result. Since the causes of these symptoms are varied, it’s best to consult a veterinarian. Often, a bland diet is recommended to rest the digestive tract and to decrease vomiting and diarrhea. Bland diets consist of a single easily digestible protein source and a simple carbohydrate. Pet owners may prepare bland diets at home or choose one of the many commercially available diets.

  • Blastomycosis is a fungal disease caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis. This fungus most commonly infects humans and animals through the respiratory tract. After the fungal spores are inhaled, they settle in the small airways and begin to reproduce. The organism then spreads throughout the body and may infect other organs. Rarely, infection occurs through contamination of an open wound.

  • Blepharitis means inflammation of the eyelid and can affect one or both eyes. The affected eyelid will usually be red, swollen, and itchy. Any condition that can cause irritation of the eyelids can lead to blepharitis. Common causes of blepharitis include congenital abnormalities, allergies, infections, tumors, and occasionally other inflammatory disorders. Your veterinarian will conduct an eye examination to determine the extent of the eyelid involvement. Specific treatment for blepharitis will depend on the underlying cause of the disorder and the prognosis depends on the cause.